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SOB
(#2985)

Front Rear Top
Front Rear Top
 
Front: Open for Rigging Rear: Open for Rigging Bottom
Front: Open for Rigging Rear: Open for Rigging Bottom

Technical Details

I acquired my SOB from wojoaonline in 2021.

The SOB is 73 mm. tall, 77 mm. wide, 24 mm. thick, and weighs 90 g.

The SOB consists of a pivoting lever and two posts mounted between two side plates. One side plate is stationary, while the other pivots on the lever axle so that it may be opened to admit the rope. The lever is spring-loaded so that the tag side closes against a smooth, slightly convex anvil. The anvil is attached to the rear face plate with two stainless steel pins, one of which is extended to engage a notch in the front face plate.

The front is printed with "SOB," an aillustration of the ascender on rope, "CE", "EN567," "GA404-2004," "Max 100kN," and "Ø8-13mm."

Comments

The SOB is one of the following closely-related rocker-arm ascenders:

Image Ascender Made in Rocker
Arm
Anvil
Ribs?
Guide
Pin?
Camnal Camnal China Aluminum Yes No
Camp Lift C.A.M.P.
Lift
Italy Aluminum Yes No
Geelife Geelife China Aluminum Yes No
Lixada Lixada China Aluminum Yes No
SOB SOB China Aluminum Yes No
Image Ascender Made in Rocker
Arm
Anvil
Ribs?
Guide
Pin?
Turin Slip-Stop Basic Turin (Турин)
Slip-Stop Basic
Russia Steel No Yes
Vento (Венто) Vento (Венто) Russia Aluminum No Yes
Vertical (Вертикаль) Drop (Капля) ver 0103 Vertical (Вертикаль) Drop (Капля)
ver 0103
Russia Aluminum No No
Vertical (Вертикаль) Drop (Капля) ver 0103 Vertical (Вертикаль) Drop (Капля)
ver 0104
Russia Steel No No
   

RiggingThese are small, reliable, but inefficient ascenders. There is a significant lost motion with each step as the entire ascender rotates under load. I wouldn't choose one of these for a long climb, but their small size might make them attractive for short, remote drops.

UseTo rig these ascenders, open the swinging plate and bring the standing rope down between the lever and the anvil. Close the swinging side gate, and insert a carabiner through the holes. When load is applied to the carabiner, the rope exerts a counter-clockwise torque on the lever, and the left side of the lever squeezes the rope against the anvil. Lifting the carabiner will allow the ascender to slide up the rope, provided there is enough rope weight below.

The Russian Turin Slip-Stop Basic and Vento each have a guide pin that the others lack. I don't notice the pin making much difference in how an ascender performs, but its weight is negligible so I see no harm in having it.

This type of device was invented by Soviet climber Yuri Gorenchuk (Юрий Горенчук). The C.A.M.P. Lift was the first non-Russian version, and it had teeth on the outside of the anvil (see the Camp Lift page for the reason why) . The teeth serve no function for the ascender whatsoever, but they were faithfully reproduced on all the Chinese copies.