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Camp Lift
(#152, 2111)

Front Rear
Front Rear
 
Top Side Open for Rigging
Top Side Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Camp Lift from K&R Adventure Gear in March 2001. I acquired another in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun’s collection.

The Camp Lift consists of a pivoting lever and two posts mounted between two side plates. One side plate is stationary, while the other pivots on the lever axle so that it may be opened to admit the rope. The lever is spring-loaded so that the tag side closes against a smooth, slightly convex anvil. The anvil is attached to the rear face plate with two stainless steel pins, one of which is extended to engage a notch in the front face plate. For some reason there are teeth on the outside of the anvil, where they cannot contact the rope.

The Camp Lift is 74 mm. tall, 78 mm. wide, and 25 mm. thick. Mine weighs 95 g.

The front of the ascender is marked with "ITALY," "1D," "ROPE," "min ø 8," "max ø 13," the Camp Logo, and the "Sieg Heil" icon. The "Sieg Heil" icon is repeated on the inside of the rear face plate.

Comments

The Camp Lift is one of the following closely-related rocker-arm ascenders:

Image Ascender Made in Rocker
Arm
Anvil
Ribs?
Guide
Pin?
Camnal Camnal China Aluminum Yes No
Camp Lift C.A.M.P.
Lift
Italy Aluminum Yes No
Geelife Geelife China Aluminum Yes No
Lixada Lixada China Aluminum Yes No
SOB SOB China Aluminum Yes No
Image Ascender Made in Rocker
Arm
Anvil
Ribs?
Guide
Pin?
Turin Slip-Stop Basic Turin (Турин)
Slip-Stop Basic
Russia Steel No Yes
Vento (Венто) Vento (Венто) Russia Aluminum No Yes
Vertical (Вертикаль) Drop (Капля) ver 0103 Vertical (Вертикаль) Drop (Капля)
ver 0103
Russia Aluminum No No
Vertical (Вертикаль) Drop (Капля) ver 0103 Vertical (Вертикаль) Drop (Капля)
ver 0104
Russia Steel No No
   

RiggingThese are small, reliable, but inefficient ascenders. There is a significant lost motion with each step as the entire ascender rotates under load. I wouldn't choose one of these for a long climb, but their small size might make them attractive for short, remote drops.

UseTo rig these ascenders, open the swinging plate and bring the standing rope down between the lever and the anvil. Close the swinging side gate, and insert a carabiner through the holes. When load is applied to the carabiner, the rope exerts a counter-clockwise torque on the lever, and the left side of the lever squeezes the rope against the anvil. Lifting the carabiner will allow the ascender to slide up the rope, provided there is enough rope weight below.

The Russian Turin Slip-Stop Basic and Vento each have a guide pin that the others lack. I don't notice the pin making much difference in how an ascender performs, but its weight is negligible so I see no harm in having it.

This type of device was invented by Soviet climber Yuri Gorenchuk (Юрий Горенчук). The C.A.M.P. Lift was the first non-Russian version, and it had teeth on the outside of the anvil . The teeth serve no function for the ascender whatsoever, but they were faithfully reproduced on all the Chinese copies.

In March 2012, Császár Csaba sent me the following note:

You wrote at the description of the Camp Lift: "For some reason there are teeth on the outside of the anvil, where they cannot contact the rope." It seems to me that Camp used the extruded raw material used for the Pro Nuts as the anvil.

This idea seemed to be correct. I wrote to Stéphane Pennequin (a good friend in Corsica who collects climbing nuts for his Nut Museum) for confirmation, and he wrote to Denis Pivot at Camp. Denis sent the following reply:

La réponse est : oui, la butée est usinée à partir d’un profil de Pro Nut # 4. Cela explique les cannelures qui ne servent à rien pour le fonctionnement du Lift.

L’utilisation du Pro Nut est facile à comprendre :

- techniquement, sa forme courbe convient parfaitement au coulissage et au blocage de la corde.

- économiquement, cela permet de gagner le coût d’une filière.

En anglais cela donne : Camp used the extruded raw material used for the Pro Nuts # 4 as the anvil of the Lift.

My crude translation of the French (I don't know any French): The answer is: Yes, the stop is machined from a profile of Pro Nut # 4. This explains the splines which do nothing for the operation of the lift. The use of Pro nut is easy to understand: technically, its curved shape fits perfectly, economically, it provides the cost savings of a common part.