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Rescue Industries Life Line
(#2502)

Front View Rear View
Front View Rear View
 
Top View Side View
Top View Side View

Technical Details

I acquired my Rescue Industries Life Line from Susan Dorsett in 2018.

My Rescue Industries Life Line is 75 mm. tall, 75 mm. wide, 45 mm. thick, and weighs 180 g.

The Life Line consists of a plastic housing with a T-handle screw on top and a waist harness attached to the side. Internally, a pivoting aluminum block and an aluminum sheet metal liner form a rope channel. The block pivots on an eye bolt that passes through the housing and is held in place by a flat washer and nylon-insert lock nut.

There are no permanent markings on the Life Line, but there are stickers on each side. The front sticker reads as follows:

FOR EMERGENCY USE ONLY
LIFELINE PORTABLE FIRE ESCAPE
mfg. by
Rescue Industries Inc.
1303 So. Atlantic Ave.
Daytona Beach, Florida 32018

Pats U.S. 356081, U.S. 16953/74
Japan 28989/74

The rear sticker reads as follows:

INSTRUCTIONS
IN CASE OF FIRE

1. Anchor rope securely.
2. Turn screw right to CLOSED
   position
3. Place rope out the window
4. Secure harness around the waist.
5. Exit out window.
6. Turn screw LEFT for descent.

Comments

The Life Line does not come with its own rope, but the box mine came in was stamped as follows

WARRANTY ANDD PRODUCT
LIABILITY VALID ONLY WHEN
USING ROPE SUPPLIED BY
RESCUE INDUSTRIES INC. OR
AUTHORIZED DEALER

I do not know what rope they supply, but I notice that the separation between the aluminum block and the liner is limited to 7.3 mm, so I imagine it is not 11 mm. PMI Pit Rope.

The mounting bracket is 19 mm. wide and 3 mm. thick. It might be strong enough to support a person of reasonable weight, but I don't think that the safety margin would be very large. I would certainly not trust the supplied #12 woodd screws for supporting my weight if installed in my window frames.

The harness is a simple waist strap secured with a plastic harness. I fear this might slip up and restrict breathing if used for too long.

Clearly this is not designed to be used as a routine caving or climbing descender. Having an escape route in case of a fire is a serious concern. I know one caver who survived a fire because of a rappel out their apartment window, and I knew two others who died in their house fire. I have other options and some experience, and so I choose one of my other descenders for contingency escape from an upper story.

Instructions Instructions Instructions